The Four Cultures of Administrative Justice

New article : A Cultural Analysis of Administrative Justice This chapter from an upcoming book is a thoughtful take on the mismatch between contemporary concepts of public management and the theories of administrative justice that they intersect with. It’s a good example of the usefulness of Grid-Group Cultural Theory to make sense of the social. … Continue reading The Four Cultures of Administrative Justice

On The Age of the Unthinkable

Some of what journalist Joshua Cooper Ramo seems to be suggesting in his book The Age of the Unthinkable is already happening at a local level. Inspired by the science of social-ecological resilience, many communities around the world are adopting strategies of transition- from oil-dependent unsustainability to something more, well, resilient. Some of this might … Continue reading On The Age of the Unthinkable

Beyond enclaves in Palestine: Constructing the physical reality of territorial integrity (Part 1)

I’ve been struck recently by three somewhat contrasting visions of physical development for a future Palestine. Palestine. Perhaps nowhere else on earth has the philosophy of space been so consistently conceived as a weapon. The sophistication of the manipulation of space for military and political purposes in the West Bank and Gaza has made the … Continue reading Beyond enclaves in Palestine: Constructing the physical reality of territorial integrity (Part 1)

‘I think we won’: Mary Douglas Interview

Mary Douglas, anthropologist and originator of what became grid-group cultural theory, was interviewed in 2006 by Cambridge anthropologist Alan MacFarlane. An annotated video is part of a large series of fascinating interviews he has conducted over many years. Exerpts are posted at Youtube (see below),  The long version is worth watching to find out what … Continue reading ‘I think we won’: Mary Douglas Interview

East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet…

Fourcultures has previously expressed frustration over the ubiquity of the fiction of 'Eastern' and 'Western' thought worlds. One antidote on offer is to read the excellent book The Shape of Ancient Thought. To get a little more up to date, another suggestion would be: Kapil Raj. Relocating Modern Science: Circulation and the Construction of Knowledge … Continue reading East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet…

Towards an institutional understanding of the ‘cultural agoraphobia’ bias

As seen on the Public Library of Science blog, Prof James Boyle has been arguing in his book The Public Domain (read for free) and a recent talk for Arcadia that society is biased against openness. Grid-group cultural theory contributes a number of factors to this discussion, as follows... A bias against the openness characterised … Continue reading Towards an institutional understanding of the ‘cultural agoraphobia’ bias