Bias: it’s not a bug, it’s a feature

"Kahan’s argument about the woman who does not believe in global warming is a surprising and persuasive example of a general principle: if we want to understand others, we can always ask what is making their behaviour ‘rational’ from their point of view. If, on the other hand, we just assume they are irrational, no … Continue reading Bias: it’s not a bug, it’s a feature

Does Cultural Theory predict its own rejection?

Commenter 'riskviews' recently suggested: I would guess that Grid-Group Theory would predict that it would not itself be widely accepted. In fact, I belive that if it WERE widely accepted, then that would prove it false. There are a few possible responses to this interesting proposition. First, riskviews could be right. Cultural theory has been explored in … Continue reading Does Cultural Theory predict its own rejection?

“God is a Brazilian” – risk perception in Brazil

John Adams of Imperial College London produced  a new preface for the Brazilian translation of his important  book Risk. His very interesting analysis of the social construction of risk is strongly informed by Grid-group cultural theory: “I have been increasingly impressed by the ability of cultural theory to bring a modicum of order and civility … Continue reading “God is a Brazilian” – risk perception in Brazil

Bias, learning to walk at the edge of Chaos

This is a guest post by Meika, for which, many thanks. Cambridge-based researchers recently published a study providing experimental data which supports the idea that the human brain lives "on the edge of chaos". Its press release ends: According to [co-author] Kitzbichler, this new evidence is only a starting point. "A natural next question we plan … Continue reading Bias, learning to walk at the edge of Chaos